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Resuscitation. 2015 Sep;94:49-54. doi: 10.1016/j.resuscitation.2015.05.015. Epub 2015 Jun 2.

The relationship between age and outcome in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients.

Author information

1
Department of Emergency Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA; Department of Anesthesiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark.
2
Department of Emergency Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA.
3
Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA.
4
Department of Emergency Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA; Department of Anesthesia Critical Care, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA.
5
Department of Emergency Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Rollins School of Public Health, Atlanta, GA, USA.
6
Department of Emergency Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA; Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA. Electronic address: mdonnino@bidmc.harvard.edu.

Abstract

AIM:

To determine the association between age and outcome in a large multicenter cohort of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients.

METHODS:

Retrospective, observational, cohort study of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest from the CARES registry between 2006 and 2013. Age was categorized into 5-year intervals and the association between age group and outcomes (return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), survival and good neurological outcome) was assessed in univariable and multivariable analysis. We performed a subgroup analysis in patients who had return of spontaneous circulation.

RESULTS:

A total of 101,968 people were included. The median age was 66 years (quartiles: 54, 78) and 39% were female. 31,236 (30.6%) of the included patients had sustained ROSC, 9761 (9.6%) survived to hospital discharge and 8058 (7.9%) survived with a good neurological outcome. The proportion of patients with ROSC was highest in those with age <20 years (34.1%) and lowest in those with age 95-99 years (23.5%). Patients with age <20 years had the highest proportion of survival (16.7%) and good neurological outcome (14.8%) whereas those with age 95-99 years had the lowest proportion of survival (1.7%) and good neurological outcome (1.2%). In the full cohort and in the patients with ROSC there appeared to be a progressive decline in survival and good neurological outcome after the age of approximately 45-64 years. Age alone was not a good predictor of outcome.

CONCLUSIONS:

Advanced age is associated with outcomes in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. We did not identify a specific age threshold beyond which the chance of a meaningful recovery was excluded.

KEYWORDS:

Age; Cardiac arrest; Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest; Outcome; Predictor

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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