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J Autism Dev Disord. 2015 Oct;45(10):3148-58. doi: 10.1007/s10803-015-2473-y.

Stop and change: inhibition and flexibility skills are related to repetitive behavior in children and young adults with autism spectrum disorders.

Author information

1
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX, Utrecht, The Netherlands. mmostert@rijndam.nl.
2
Rijndam Rehabilitation, Dordrecht, The Netherlands. mmostert@rijndam.nl.
3
Donders Centre for Neuroscience, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Reinier Postlaan 12, 6525 GC, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
4
Karakter Centre for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Reinier Postlaan 12, 6525 GC, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
5
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
6
Department of Medical Psychology, University Medical Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Abstract

Cognitive control dysfunctions, like inhibitory and attentional flexibility deficits are assumed to underlie repetitive behavior in individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). In the present study, prepotent response inhibition and attentional flexibility were examined in 64 high-functioning individuals with ASD and 53 control participants. Performance under different task conditions were tested both in response to visual and auditory information, and requiring a motor or verbal response. Individuals with ASD showed significant more control dysfunctions than typically developing participants on the auditory computer task. Inhibitory control and attentional flexibility predicted RRB in everyday life. Specifically, response inhibition in reaction to visual information and task switching in reaction to auditory information predicted motor and sensory stereotyped behavior.

KEYWORDS:

Auditory information; Autism spectrum disorders; Flexibility; Inhibition; Repetitive behaviors

PMID:
26043846
PMCID:
PMC4569655
DOI:
10.1007/s10803-015-2473-y
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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