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Biomaterials. 2015 Aug;61:339-48. doi: 10.1016/j.biomaterials.2015.05.005. Epub 2015 May 28.

Epicardial application of cardiac progenitor cells in a 3D-printed gelatin/hyaluronic acid patch preserves cardiac function after myocardial infarction.

Author information

1
Dept. of Cardiology, DH&L, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands; Dept. of Molecular Medicine, Cenci-Bolognetti Foundation, Pasteur Institute, "Sapienza" University of Rome, Rome, Italy; Dept. of Bioengineering and Sanford Consortium for Regenerative Medicine, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, USA. Electronic address: R.gaetani@umcutrecht.nl.
2
Dept. of Cardiology, DH&L, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
3
Dept. of Molecular Medicine, Cenci-Bolognetti Foundation, Pasteur Institute, "Sapienza" University of Rome, Rome, Italy.
4
Dept. of Bioengineering and Sanford Consortium for Regenerative Medicine, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, USA.
5
Dept. of Cardiology, DH&L, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands; Interuniversity Cardiology Institute of the Netherlands (ICIN), Utrecht, The Netherlands.
6
Dept. of Cardiology, DH&L, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands; Interuniversity Cardiology Institute of the Netherlands (ICIN), Utrecht, The Netherlands. Electronic address: J.Sluijter@umcutrecht.nl.

Abstract

Cardiac cell therapy suffers from limitations related to poor engraftment and significant cell death after transplantation. In this regard, ex vivo tissue engineering is a tool that has been demonstrated to increase cell retention and survival. The aim of our study was to evaluate the therapeutic potential of a 3D-printed patch composed of human cardiac-derived progenitor cells (hCMPCs) in a hyaluronic acid/gelatin (HA/gel) based matrix. hCMPCs were printed in the HA/gel matrix (30 × 10(6) cells/ml) to form a biocomplex made of six perpendicularly printed layers with a surface of 2 × 2 cm and thickness of 400 μm, in which they retained their viability, proliferation and differentiation capability. The printed biocomplex was transplanted in a mouse model of myocardial infarction (MI). The application of the patch led to a significant reduction in adverse remodeling and preservation of cardiac performance as was shown by both MRI and histology. Furthermore, the matrix supported the long-term in vivo survival and engraftment of hCMPCs, which exhibited a temporal increase in cardiac and vascular differentiation markers over the course of the 4 week follow-up period. Overall, we developed an effective and translational approach to enhance hCMPC delivery and action in the heart.

KEYWORDS:

Cardiac progenitor cells; Cardiac regeneration; Cardiac tissue engineering; Heart failure; Tissue printing

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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