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Trends Ecol Evol. 2015 Jun;30(6):299-302. doi: 10.1016/j.tree.2015.04.003.

Lifting baselines to address the consequences of conservation success.

Author information

1
Gund Institute for Ecological Economics, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT 05405, USA; Division of Marine Science and Conservation, Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University Marine Lab, Beaufort, NC 28516, USA. Electronic address: jroman@uvm.edu.
2
Division of Marine Science and Conservation, Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University Marine Lab, Beaufort, NC 28516, USA.

Abstract

Biologists and policymakers are accustomed to managing species in decline, but for the first time in generations they are also encountering recovering populations of ocean predators. Many citizens perceive these species as invaders and conflicts are increasing. It is time to celebrate these hard-earned successes and lift baselines for recovering species.

KEYWORDS:

conservation success; endangered species; historical abundance; marine mammals; recovery; shifting baselines

PMID:
26042680
DOI:
10.1016/j.tree.2015.04.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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