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Eur J Endocrinol. 2015 Sep;173(3):305-12. doi: 10.1530/EJE-15-0284. Epub 2015 Jun 3.

Coronary artery disease risk among obese metabolically healthy young men.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine 'B'Dr. Pinchas Bornstein Talpiot Medical Leadership ProgramChaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Ramat Gan 52621, IsraelIsrael Defense Forces Medical CorpsRamat Gan, IsraelDivision of Endocrinology and MetabolismPopulation Healthy Research Institute, McMaster University and Hamilton Health Sciences, Hamilton, Ontario, CanadaSackler School of MedicineTel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, IsraelIsrael Ministry of HealthJerusalem, IsraelDepartment of EndocrinologyChaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Ramat Gan 52621, IsraelDivision of EndocrinologyDiabetes and Hypertension, Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA Department of Medicine 'B'Dr. Pinchas Bornstein Talpiot Medical Leadership ProgramChaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Ramat Gan 52621, IsraelIsrael Defense Forces Medical CorpsRamat Gan, IsraelDivision of Endocrinology and MetabolismPopulation Healthy Research Institute, McMaster University and Hamilton Health Sciences, Hamilton, Ontario, CanadaSackler School of MedicineTel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, IsraelIsrael Ministry of HealthJerusalem, IsraelDepartment of EndocrinologyChaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Ramat Gan 52621, IsraelDivision of EndocrinologyDiabetes and Hypertension, Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA Department of Medicine 'B'Dr. Pinchas Bornstein Talpiot Medical Leadership ProgramChaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Ramat Gan 52621, IsraelIsrael Defense Forces Medical CorpsRamat Gan, IsraelDivision of Endocrinology and MetabolismPopulation Healthy Research Institute, McMaster University and Hamilton Health Sciences, Hamilton, Ontario, CanadaSackler School of MedicineTel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, IsraelIsrael Ministry of HealthJerusalem, IsraelDepartment of EndocrinologyChaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Ramat Gan 52621, IsraelDivision of EndocrinologyDiabetes and Hypertension, Harvard Medical School, Brigham
2
Department of Medicine 'B'Dr. Pinchas Bornstein Talpiot Medical Leadership ProgramChaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Ramat Gan 52621, IsraelIsrael Defense Forces Medical CorpsRamat Gan, IsraelDivision of Endocrinology and MetabolismPopulation Healthy Research Institute, McMaster University and Hamilton Health Sciences, Hamilton, Ontario, CanadaSackler School of MedicineTel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, IsraelIsrael Ministry of HealthJerusalem, IsraelDepartment of EndocrinologyChaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Ramat Gan 52621, IsraelDivision of EndocrinologyDiabetes and Hypertension, Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
3
Department of Medicine 'B'Dr. Pinchas Bornstein Talpiot Medical Leadership ProgramChaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Ramat Gan 52621, IsraelIsrael Defense Forces Medical CorpsRamat Gan, IsraelDivision of Endocrinology and MetabolismPopulation Healthy Research Institute, McMaster University and Hamilton Health Sciences, Hamilton, Ontario, CanadaSackler School of MedicineTel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, IsraelIsrael Ministry of HealthJerusalem, IsraelDepartment of EndocrinologyChaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Ramat Gan 52621, IsraelDivision of EndocrinologyDiabetes and Hypertension, Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA Department of Medicine 'B'Dr. Pinchas Bornstein Talpiot Medical Leadership ProgramChaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Ramat Gan 52621, IsraelIsrael Defense Forces Medical CorpsRamat Gan, IsraelDivision of Endocrinology and MetabolismPopulation Healthy Research Institute, McMaster University and Hamilton Health Sciences, Hamilton, Ontario, CanadaSackler School of MedicineTel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, IsraelIsrael Ministry of HealthJerusalem, IsraelDepartment of EndocrinologyChaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Ramat Gan 52621, IsraelDivision of EndocrinologyDiabetes and Hypertension, Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of this study was to assess coronary artery disease (CAD) risk among obese young men without metabolic risk factors.

DESIGN:

A longitudinal study in a historical cohort.

METHODS:

Incident CAD during a median follow-up of 6.1 years was assessed among 31,684 young men (mean age 31.2 ± 5.7 years) of the Metabolic, Lifestyle and Nutrition Assessment in Young Adults (MELANY) cohort. Participants were categorized by BMI and the number of metabolic abnormalities (based on the Adult Treatment Panel-III). Metabolically healthy (MH) obesity was defined as BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2) in the presence of normal blood pressure (BP) and normal levels of fasting glucose, triglyceride, and HDL-cholesterol (HDL-c) levels (n = 599; 1.9%). Cox proportional hazard models were applied.

RESULTS:

There were 198 new cases of CAD that were diagnosed during 209,971 person-years of follow-up, of which six cases occurred among MH obese. The incidence of CAD among MH lean, overweight, and obese participants was 0.23, 0.45, and 1.0/1000 person-years respectively. In a multivariable model adjusted for clinical and biochemical CAD risk factors, a higher CAD risk was observed among MH-obese (hazard ratio = 3.08; 95% CI = 1.10-8.68, P = 0.033), compared to MH-normal weight subjects. This risk persisted when BMI was treated as a time-dependent variable, or when fasting glucose, HDL-c, triglycerides, or BP were added to the model. Similar results were also obtained when a more permissive definition of MH was used.

CONCLUSIONS:

Obesity may continue to contribute to increased risk for incident CAD in young men even in the presence of a healthy metabolic profile.

PMID:
26041076
DOI:
10.1530/EJE-15-0284
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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