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Sci Rep. 2015 Jun 4;5:9983. doi: 10.1038/srep09983.

Bicarbonate transporters in corals point towards a key step in the evolution of cnidarian calcification.

Author information

1
Centre Scientifique de Monaco, 8 quai Antoine Ier, Monaco, 98000, Monaco.
2
ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD 4811, Australia.
3
Red Sea Research Center, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Thuwal, Saudi Arabia.
4
Department of Biochemistry, University of Alberta Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2H7, Canada.

Abstract

The bicarbonate ion (HCO3(-)) is involved in two major physiological processes in corals, biomineralization and photosynthesis, yet no molecular data on bicarbonate transporters are available. Here, we characterized plasma membrane-type HCO3(-) transporters in the scleractinian coral Stylophora pistillata. Eight solute carrier (SLC) genes were found in the genome: five homologs of mammalian-type SLC4 family members, and three of mammalian-type SLC26 family members. Using relative expression analysis and immunostaining, we analyzed the cellular distribution of these transporters and conducted phylogenetic analyses to determine the extent of conservation among cnidarian model organisms. Our data suggest that the SLC4γ isoform is specific to scleractinian corals and responsible for supplying HCO3(-) to the site of calcification. Taken together, SLC4γ appears to be one of the key genes for skeleton building in corals, which bears profound implications for our understanding of coral biomineralization and the evolution of scleractinian corals within cnidarians.

PMID:
26040894
PMCID:
PMC4650655
DOI:
10.1038/srep09983
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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