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Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2015 Jul;1347:1-28. doi: 10.1111/nyas.12778. Epub 2015 Jun 2.

Early-life influences on obesity: from preconception to adolescence.

Author information

1
Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China.
2
C.S. Mott Center for Human Growth and Development and Center for Molecular Medicine and Genetics, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan.
3
Center of Community Resilience, School of Public Health, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, California.
4
Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
5
New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York.
6
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland.
7
Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee.
8
Departments of Pediatrics and Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine and USDA/ARS Children's Nutrition Research Center, Houston, Texas.
9
Monell Chemical Senses Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
10
University of California Los Angeles Medical Center, Los Angeles, California.
11
University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado.
12
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom.
13
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Department of Cell Biology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.
14
SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York.

Abstract

The double burden of under- and overnutrition profoundly affects human health globally. According to the World Health Organization, obesity and diabetes rates have almost doubled worldwide since 1980, and, in 2011, more than 40 million children under 5 years of age were overweight. Ecologic factors, parental genetics and fitness, and the intrauterine environment significantly influence the likelihood of offspring developing the dysmetabolic diathesis of obesity. This report examines the effects of these factors, including preconception, intrauterine and postnatal energy balance affecting programming of transgenerational transmission, and development of chronic diseases later in life-in particular, diabesity and its comorbidities.

KEYWORDS:

breast feeding; diabesity; econutritional; epigenetics; exercise; microbiome; nutrition; obesity; taste preferences

PMID:
26037603
PMCID:
PMC4522218
DOI:
10.1111/nyas.12778
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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