Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Conscious Cogn. 2015 Sep;35:150-5. doi: 10.1016/j.concog.2015.05.005. Epub 2015 May 29.

The Mozart Effect: A quantitative EEG study.

Author information

1
Department of Cardiovascular, Respiratory, Nephrologic, Anesthesiologic and Geriatric Sciences, Sapienza University of Rome, viale del Policlinico 155, Rome, Italy. Electronic address: walter.verrusio@uniroma1.it.
2
Department of Cardiovascular, Respiratory, Nephrologic, Anesthesiologic and Geriatric Sciences, Sapienza University of Rome, viale del Policlinico 155, Rome, Italy.
3
Department of Neurology and Psychiatry, Sapienza University of Rome, Italy.
4
National Centre of Epidemiology, National Institute of Health, via Giano della Bella 34, Rome, Italy.

Abstract

The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of Mozart's music on brain activity through spectral analysis of the EEG in young healthy adults (Adults), in healthy elderly (Elderly) and in elderly with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI). EEG recording was performed at basal rest conditions and after listening to Mozart's K448 or "Fur Elise" Beethoven's sonatas. After listening to Mozart, an increase of alpha band and median frequency index of background alpha rhythm activity (a pattern of brain wave activity linked to memory, cognition and open mind to problem solving) was observed both in Adults and in Elderly. No changes were observed in MCI. After listening to Beethoven, no changes in EEG activity were detected. This results may be representative of the fact that said Mozart's music is able to "activate" neuronal cortical circuits related to attentive and cognitive functions.

KEYWORDS:

Cognition; Mozart Effect; Problem solving; qEEG

PMID:
26036835
DOI:
10.1016/j.concog.2015.05.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center