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J Autism Dev Disord. 2015 Oct;45(10):3195-203. doi: 10.1007/s10803-015-2477-7.

The association between autism spectrum disorders and congenital anomalies by organ systems in a Finnish national birth cohort.

Author information

1
Department of Child Psychiatry, University of Turku and Turku University Central Hospital, Turku, Finland. lamtim@utu.fi.
2
Department of Child Neurology, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland. lamtim@utu.fi.
3
Department of Child Psychiatry, University of Turku and Turku University Central Hospital, Turku, Finland.
4
Department of Psychiatry, New York State Psychiatric Institute, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA.
5
Teratology Information Service, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
6
Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Helsinki University and Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
7
National Institute of Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
8
Nordic School of Public Health, Gothenburg, Sweden.
9
Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA.
10
Department of Child Neurology, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.

Abstract

The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between autism spectrum disorders (ASD) with and without intellectual disability (ID) and congenital anomalies (CAs) by organ system. The sample included all children diagnosed with ASD (n = 4441) from the Finnish Hospital Discharge Register during 1987-2000 and a total of four controls per case (n = 17,695). CAs of the eye, central nervous system, and specific craniofacial anomalies were most strongly associated with ASD. Children with ASD and co-occurring ID were more likely to have CAs compared to ASD children without ID. The results suggest that some cases of ASD may originate during organogenesis, in the early first trimester of pregnancy. The results of this study may be useful for identifying prenatal etiological factors and elucidating the molecular pathogenesis of ASD.

KEYWORDS:

Autism spectrum disorders; Birth defects; Congenital anomalies; Malformations

PMID:
26036648
DOI:
10.1007/s10803-015-2477-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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