Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Phlebology. 2016 Jun;31(5):305-24. doi: 10.1177/0268355515586526. Epub 2015 Jun 2.

Impact of CCSVI on cerebral haemodynamics: a mathematical study using MRI angiographic and flow data.

Author information

1
Computer Science Department, National Laboratory for Scientific Computing, LNCC/MCTI, Petrópolis, RJ, Brazil Laboratory of Applied Mathematics, Department of Civil, Environmental and Mechanical Engineering, University of Trento, Trento, Italy lmuller@lncc.br.
2
Laboratory of Applied Mathematics, Department of Civil, Environmental and Mechanical Engineering, University of Trento, Trento, Italy.
3
Department of Biomedical Engineering, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI, USA Magnetic Resonance Innovations, Inc. Detroit, MI, USA.
4
Magnetic Resonance Innovations, Inc. Detroit, MI, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The presence of abnormal anatomy and flow in neck veins has been recently linked to neurological diseases. The precise impact of extra-cranial abnormalities such as stenoses remains unexplored.

METHODS:

Pressure and velocity fields in the full cardiovascular system are computed by means of a global mathematical model that accounts for the relationship between pulsating cerebral blood flow and intracranial pressure.

RESULTS:

Our model predicts that extra-cranial strictures cause increased pressure in the cerebral venous system. Specifically, there is a predicted pressure increase of about 10% in patients with a 90% stenoses. Pressure increases are related to significant flow redistribution with flow reduction of up to 70% in stenosed vessels and consequent flow increase in collateral pathways.

CONCLUSIONS:

Extra-cranial venous strictures can lead to pressure increases in intra-cranial veins of up to 1.3 mmHg, despite the shielding role of the Starling resistor. The long-term clinical implications of the predicted pressure changes are unclear.

KEYWORDS:

CCSVI; MRI-derived patient-specific venous network; cerebral venous hypertension; global mathematical model; human circulation

PMID:
26036249
DOI:
10.1177/0268355515586526
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Atypon
Loading ...
Support Center