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Magn Reson Med. 2016 Apr;75(4):1669-76. doi: 10.1002/mrm.25784. Epub 2015 May 28.

Second-order motion-compensated spin echo diffusion tensor imaging of the human heart.

Author information

1
Institute for Biomedical Engineering, University and ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.
2
Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, King's College London, London, United Kingdom.
3
Centre for Medical Imaging, University College London, London, United Kingdom.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Myocardial microstructure has been challenging to probe in vivo. Spin echo-based diffusion-weighted sequences allow for single-shot acquisitions but are highly sensitive to cardiac motion. In this study, the use of second-order motion-compensated diffusion encoding was compared with first-order motion-compensated diffusion-weighted imaging during systolic contraction of the heart.

METHODS:

First- and second-order motion-compensated diffusion encoding gradients were incorporated into a triggered single-shot spin echo sequence. The effect of contractile motion on the apparent diffusion coefficients and tensor orientations was investigated in vivo from basal to apical level of the heart.

RESULTS:

Second-order motion compensation was found to increase the range of systolic trigger delays from 30%-55% to 15%-77% peak systole at the apex and from 25%-50% to 15%-79% peak systole at the base. Diffusion tensor analysis yielded more physiological transmural distributions when using second-order motion-compensated diffusion tensor imaging.

CONCLUSION:

Higher-order motion-compensated diffusion encoding decreases the sensitivity to cardiac motion, thereby enabling cardiac DTI over a wider range of time points during systolic contraction of the heart.

KEYWORDS:

diffusion tensor imaging; in vivo cardiac DTI; myocardial microstructure; spin-echo

PMID:
26033456
DOI:
10.1002/mrm.25784
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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