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Mol Psychiatry. 2015 Dec;20(12):1508-15. doi: 10.1038/mp.2015.66. Epub 2015 Jun 2.

Connectome-wide network analysis of youth with Psychosis-Spectrum symptoms.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
2
Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
3
Departments of Bioengineering and Electrical and Systems Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
4
Department of Psychology, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA.
5
Center for the Developing Brain, Child Mind Institute, New York, NY, USA.
6
Center for Biomedical Imaging and Neuromodulation, Nathan S. Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research; Orangeburg, NY, USA.
7
Center for Applied Genomics, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
8
Department of Pediatrics, The Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
9
Department of Radiology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
10
Philadelphia Veterans Administration Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA, USA.

Abstract

Adults with psychotic disorders have dysconnectivity in critical brain networks, including the default mode (DM) and the cingulo-opercular (CO) networks. However, it is unknown whether such deficits are present in youth with less severe symptoms. We conducted a multivariate connectome-wide association study examining dysconnectivity with resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging in a population-based cohort of 188 youths aged 8-22 years with psychosis-spectrum (PS) symptoms and 204 typically developing (TD) comparators. We found evidence for multi-focal dysconnectivity in PS youths, implicating the bilateral anterior cingulate, frontal pole, medial temporal lobe, opercular cortex and right orbitofrontal cortex. Follow-up seed-based and network-level analyses demonstrated that these results were driven by hyper-connectivity among DM regions and diminished connectivity among CO regions, as well as diminished coupling between frontal and DM regions. Collectively, these results provide novel evidence for functional dysconnectivity in PS youths, which show marked correspondence to abnormalities reported in adults with established psychotic disorders.

PMID:
26033240
PMCID:
PMC4651819
DOI:
10.1038/mp.2015.66
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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