Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Am J Emerg Med. 2015 Sep;33(9):1140-5. doi: 10.1016/j.ajem.2015.05.002. Epub 2015 May 13.

Carbon monoxide poisoning deaths in the United States, 1999 to 2012.

Author information

1
Air Pollution and Respiratory Health Branch, Division of Environmental Hazards and Health Effects, National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Chamblee, GA 30341. Electronic address: ddq0@cdc.gov.
2
Cazador Contractor, Herndon, Virginia, United States.
3
Environmental Public Health Tracking, Division of Environmental Hazards and Health Effects, National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Chamblee, GA 30341.
4
Air Pollution and Respiratory Health Branch, Division of Environmental Hazards and Health Effects, National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Chamblee, GA 30341.
5
Epidemiology Workforce Branch, Division of Scientific Education and Professional Development, Center for Surveillance, Epidemiology and Laboratory Service, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Chamblee, GA 30341.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Unintentional, non-fire related (UNFR) carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning deaths are preventable. Surveillance of the populations most at-risk for unintentional, non-fire related (UNFR) carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning is crucial for targeting prevention efforts.

OBJECTIVE:

This study provides estimates on UNFR CO poisoning mortality in the United States and characterizes the at-risk populations.

METHODS:

We used 1999 to 2012 data to calculate death rates. We used underlying and multiple conditions variables from death records to identify UNFR CO poisoning cases.

RESULTS:

For this study, we identified 6136 CO poisoning fatalities during 1999 to 2012 resulting in an average of 438 deaths annually. The annual average age-adjusted death rate was 1.48 deaths per million. Fifty four percent of the deaths occurred in a home. Age-adjusted death rates were highest for males (2.21 deaths per million) and non-Hispanic blacks (1.74 deaths per million). The age-specific death rate was highest for those aged ≥85 years (6.00 deaths per million). The annual rate of UNFR CO poisoning deaths did not change substantially during the study period, but we observed a decrease in the rate of suicide and unintentional fire related cases.

CONCLUSION:

CO poisoning was the second most common non-medicinal poisonings death. Developing and enhancing current public health interventions could reduce ongoing exposures to CO from common sources, such as those in the residential setting.

PMID:
26032660
PMCID:
PMC4573527
DOI:
10.1016/j.ajem.2015.05.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center