Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Am J Ophthalmol. 2015 Sep;160(3):422-429.e1. doi: 10.1016/j.ajo.2015.05.024. Epub 2015 May 30.

Graft failure and intraocular pressure control after keratoplasty in iridocorneal endothelial syndrome.

Author information

1
Singapore National Eye Centre, Singapore; Singapore National Eye Research Institute, Singapore.
2
Singapore National Eye Research Institute, Singapore.
3
Singapore National Eye Centre, Singapore; Singapore National Eye Research Institute, Singapore; Duke-National University of Singapore Graduate Medical School, Singapore.
4
Singapore National Eye Research Institute, Singapore; Department of Ophthalmology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul, South Korea.
5
Singapore National Eye Centre, Singapore; Singapore National Eye Research Institute, Singapore; Department of Ophthalmology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University Hospital Health System, Singapore.
6
Price Vision Group, Indianapolis, Indiana.
7
Cornea Research Foundation of America, Indianapolis, Indiana.
8
Singapore National Eye Centre, Singapore; Singapore National Eye Research Institute, Singapore; Duke-National University of Singapore Graduate Medical School, Singapore; Department of Ophthalmology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University Hospital Health System, Singapore. Electronic address: jodmehta@gmail.com.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To describe and compare graft survival and intraocular pressure (IOP) control after penetrating keratoplasty (PK) and Descemet stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty (DSAEK) in eyes with iridocorneal endothelial (ICE) syndrome.

DESIGN:

Retrospective case series.

METHODS:

Multicenter study conducted at the Singapore National Eye Centre (SNEC) and Price Vision Group. Twenty-nine consecutive eyes with ICE syndrome that underwent keratoplasty between 1991 and 2011 were identified from the SNEC transplant database and Price Vision Group patient database and the following data extracted: demographics, graft failure, IOP indices, and glaucoma treatment pre- and postkeratoplasty. The main outcome measures were graft failure and need for additional IOP-lowering treatment after keratoplasty.

RESULTS:

The mean follow-up duration was 7.0 ± 4.9 years in the PK group (n = 17) and 4.0 ± 2.6 years in the DSAEK group (n = 12). After a mean of 4.1 ± 3.1 years, 37.9% of grafts (11/29) failed: 7 PK compared to 4 DSAEK (P = .72). The graft failure rate was 50% in eyes with prekeratoplasty glaucoma surgery vs 31.6% in those without (P = .43). Additional glaucoma treatment was required in 37.9% of eyes (11/29): 41.2% of PK eyes and 50% of DSAEK eyes (P = .28) Eyes that had undergone glaucoma surgery before keratoplasty were less likely to require escalation of IOP-lowering therapy postkeratoplasty (9.1% vs 50%, P = .03).

CONCLUSIONS:

One-third of grafts failed after keratoplasty for ICE syndrome at a mean duration of 4 years and additional IOP-lowering treatment was required in 37.9%. Both PK and DSAEK had similar outcomes with regard to graft failure and IOP control.

PMID:
26032193
DOI:
10.1016/j.ajo.2015.05.024
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center