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Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2015 Jul;39(7):1260-6. doi: 10.1111/acer.12760. Epub 2015 May 29.

Randomized Controlled Trial of Mailed Personalized Feedback for Risky Drinkers in the Emergency Department: The Impact on Alcohol Consumption, Alcohol-Related Injuries, and Repeat Emergency Department Presentations.

Author information

1
Centre for Big Data Research in Health, UNSW Australia, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
2
Centre for Health Research, University of Western Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
3
National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre, UNSW Australia, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
4
Drug Health Service, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital and Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Due to the difficulty encountered in disseminating resource-intensive emergency department (ED)-based brief alcohol interventions into real-world settings, this study evaluated the effect of a mailed personalized feedback intervention for problem drinking ED patients. At 6-week follow-up, this intervention was associated with a statistically significant reduction in alcohol consumption among patients with alcohol-involved ED presentations. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of this intervention over time.

METHODS:

A randomized controlled trial was conducted among problem drinking ED patients, defined as those scoring 8 or more on the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test. Participants in the intervention group received mailed personalized feedback regarding their alcohol consumption. The control group received no feedback. Follow-up interviews were conducted over the phone, postal survey, or email survey 6 weeks and 6 months after baseline screening, and repeat ED presentations over 12-month follow-up were ascertained via linked ED records.

RESULTS:

Six-month follow-up interviews were completed with 210 participants (69%), and linked ED records were obtained for 286 participants (94%). The intervention had no effect on alcohol consumption, while findings regarding alcohol-related injuries and repeat ED presentations remain inconclusive.

CONCLUSIONS:

Further research in which the receipt of feedback is improved and a booster intervention is provided is recommended.

KEYWORDS:

Alcohol; Brief Intervention; Emergency Department; Feedback; Rural

PMID:
26031313
DOI:
10.1111/acer.12760
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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