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Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2015 Jun;56(6):3522-30. doi: 10.1167/iovs.15-16825.

Age-related changes in the anterior segment biometry during accommodation.

Author information

1
Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, United States 2School of Ophthalmology and Optometry, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou, China.
2
Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, United States.
3
Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, United States 3Hangzhou First People's Hospital, Hangzhou, China.
4
School of Ophthalmology and Optometry, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou, China.
5
Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, United States 4Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Miami, Miami, Florida, United States.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

We investigated the dynamic response of human accommodative elements as a function of age during accommodation using synchronized spectral domain optical coherence tomography devices (SD-OCT).

METHODS:

We enrolled 33 left eyes from 33 healthy subjects (age range, 20-39 years, 17 males and 16 females). Two SD-OCT devices were synchronized to simultaneously image the anterior segment through pupil and the ciliary muscle during 6.00 diopter (D) accommodation for approximately 3.7 seconds in two repeated measurements. The anterior segment parameters included the lens thickness (LT), radius of curvature of the lens anterior surface (LAC), maximum thickness of ciliary muscle (CMTMAX), and anterior length of the ciliary muscle (CMAL). A first-order exponential equation was used to fit the dynamic changes during accommodation. The age-related changes in the dynamic response and their relationship were calculated and compared.

RESULTS:

The amplitude (r = -0.40 and 0.53 for LT and LAC, respectively) and peak velocity (r = -0.65 and 0.71 for LT and LAC, respectively) of the changes in LT and LAC significantly decreased with age (P < 0.05), whereas the parameters of the ciliary muscle remained unchanged (P > 0.05), except for the peak velocity of the CMAL (r = 0.44, P = 0.01). The difference in the time constant between the lens reshaping (LT and LAC) and CMTMAX increased with age (r = 0.46 and 0.57 for LT and LAC, respectively, P < 0.01). The changes in LT and LAC per millimeter of CMTMAX change decreased with age (r = -0.52 and -0.34, respectively, P < 0.05). The ciliary muscle forward movement correlated with the lens deformation (r = -0.35 and 0.40 for amplitude, while r = 0.36 and 0.58 for time constant, respectively, P < 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS:

Age-related changes in the lens reshaping and ciliary muscle forward movement were found. Lens reshaping was much slower than the contraction of the ciliary muscle, especially in aging eyes, and this process required the ciliary muscle to contract more to reach a given response.

PMID:
26030106
PMCID:
PMC4464043
DOI:
10.1167/iovs.15-16825
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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