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J Psychosom Res. 2015 Oct;79(4):288-94. doi: 10.1016/j.jpsychores.2015.05.009. Epub 2015 May 21.

A community-based cross-sectional study of fatigue in middle-aged and elderly women.

Author information

1
Institute of Public Health, School of Nursing, Henan University, Kaifeng, China. Electronic address: jing53905@163.com.
2
Department of Preventive Medicine, School of Public Health, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, China. Electronic address: wjiaji@163.com.
3
Department of Preventive Medicine, School of Public Health, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, China. Electronic address: linweiquan0503@163.com.
4
Department of Preventive Medicine, School of Public Health, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, China. Electronic address: gz-leizeng@163.com.
5
Institute of Public Health, School of Nursing, Henan University, Kaifeng, China; Department of Preventive Medicine, School of Public Health, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, China. Electronic address: peixi001@163.com.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Fatigue has been widely studied in the general population; however, limited studies have investigated it in the female population. The objectives of this community-based study were to (1) investigate the prevalence of fatigue, (2) explore the relationship between gynecological history and experiences of fatigue, and (3) identify risk factors for fatigue in middle-aged and elderly women.

METHODS:

Based on a cross-sectional health study that employed a multi-instrument questionnaire, 1272 women aged 45years or older dwelling in the community were included. The Chinese version of Chalder Fatigue Scale (CFS) was used to assess fatigue, and socio-demographic, health-related, and gynecological data were also collected. Fatigue was defined as a total CFS score≥4.

RESULTS:

The prevalence of fatigue among women aged over 45years was 33.9%. Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified that older age, single marital status, lower education level, the presence of chronic diseases, underweight, hospitalization in the last year, postmenopause, and a higher number of live births were associated with an increased risk of fatigue (P<0.05).

CONCLUSIONS:

Our results indicated that fatigue was common in middle-aged and elderly females. Being postmenopausal and having more than three live births were the particular gynecological factors contributing to fatigue in the general population.

KEYWORDS:

Community-based study; Fatigue; Menopause; Middle-aged and elderly female; Number of live births

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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