Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Trends Microbiol. 2015 Sep;23(9):537-544. doi: 10.1016/j.tim.2015.05.002. Epub 2015 May 29.

The potential impact of coinfection on antimicrobial chemotherapy and drug resistance.

Author information

1
Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, USA.
2
Division of Infectious Diseases and Hospital Epidemiology, University Hospital Zürich, University of Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland.
3
Institute of Medical Virology, University of Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland.
4
Department of Epidemiology of Microbial Diseases, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT, USA.
5
Department of Entomology, Gardner Hall, Derieux Place, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7613, USA.
6
ISGlobal, Barcelona Ctr. Int. Health Res. (CRESIB), Hospital Clínic -Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
7
Medical Scientist Training Program, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA.
8
Department of Diagnostic Medicine/Pathobiology, Institute of Computational Comparative Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, USA.
9
Fogarty International Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA.
#
Contributed equally

Erratum in

Abstract

Across a range of pathogens, resistance to chemotherapy is a growing problem in both public health and animal health. Despite the ubiquity of coinfection, and its potential effects on within-host biology, the role played by coinfecting pathogens on the evolution of resistance and efficacy of antimicrobial chemotherapy is rarely considered. In this review, we provide an overview of the mechanisms of interaction of coinfecting pathogens, ranging from immune modulation and resource modulation, to drug interactions. We discuss their potential implications for the evolution of resistance, providing evidence in the rare cases where it is available. Overall, our review indicates that the impact of coinfection has the potential to be considerable, suggesting that this should be taken into account when designing antimicrobial drug treatments.

KEYWORDS:

coinfection; drug resistance; immune modulation; parasite interactions; resource competition

PMID:
26028590
PMCID:
PMC4835347
DOI:
10.1016/j.tim.2015.05.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center