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Psychiatry Res. 2015 Aug 30;228(3):918-24. doi: 10.1016/j.psychres.2015.04.012. Epub 2015 Apr 15.

Prevalence and construct validity of compulsive buying disorder in shopping mall visitors.

Author information

1
Department of Clinical Psychology and Addiction, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary; Doctoral School of Psychology, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary. Electronic address: aniko.maraz@ppk.elte.hu.
2
Amsterdam Institute for Addiction Research, Department of Psychiatry, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
3
Department of Clinical Psychology and Addiction, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary.

Abstract

Compulsive buying is a relatively new psychopathological concept and very few data are currently available regarding the prevalence and validity of compulsive buying disorder. In this cross-sectional study, we establish the prevalence of compulsive buying disorder in shopping mall visitors and explore the construct validity of the concept using the revised version of the Edwards Compulsive Buying Scale in 1441 shopping mall visitors looking at shopping habits, current substance use (smoking, alcohol and illicit drug) and various psychological characteristics. Overall, 8.7% (95% CI: 7.3-10.3) of our sample was classified as having a compulsive buying disorder. Compulsive buyers were younger, less educated and more likely to be female than non-compulsive buyers. They were also more likely to have used licit and illicit substances. Compulsive buyers also reported higher levels of impulsivity and obsessive-compulsive symptoms, lower levels of well-being and self-esteem and more psychological distress. Finally, compulsive buyers were five times more likely to meet criteria for borderline personality disorder than non-compulsive buyers. Compulsive buying is a frequent disorder in shopping mall visitors and is associated with important and robust indicators of psychopathology thus supporting the validity of the construct.

KEYWORDS:

Behavioural addiction; Compulsive shopping; Consumer behaviour; Prevalence; Shopping addiction

PMID:
26027442
DOI:
10.1016/j.psychres.2015.04.012
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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