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Gynecol Oncol. 2015 Aug;138(2):317-22. doi: 10.1016/j.ygyno.2015.05.028. Epub 2015 May 28.

Acceptability of self-sample human papillomavirus testing among medically underserved women visiting the emergency department.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, United States; Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, United States. Electronic address: jrmontea@bcm.edu.
2
The University of Texas School of Medicine, Houston, TX, United States.
3
Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, United States; Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, United States; Department of Pathology & Immunology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, United States.
4
Department of Emergency Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, United States.
5
Department of Emergency Medicine, The University of Texas School of Medicine, Houston, TX, United States.
6
Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, United States; Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, United States.
7
Department of Gynecologic Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, United States; Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Lyndon Baines Johnson Hospital, Harris Health System, Houston, TX, United States.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Self-sample human papillomavirus (HPV) testing in public emergency departments (EDs) may be a viable strategy to opportunistically screen women who otherwise do not attend for regular Papanicolaou test-based cervical cancer screening. We describe the acceptability of self-sample HPV testing among women presenting to two high-volume, urban EDs that primarily care for the medically underserved.

METHODS:

In 2014, a total of 210 women 21 years of age and older were recruited from two public ED waiting areas following a two-stage cluster sampling design. Questionnaire items inquired about demographics, healthcare access and utilization, history of cervical cancer screening, and acceptability of self-sample HPV testing. Descriptive analyses were performed.

RESULTS:

Overall, 34.8% of participants were considered screening non-attendees based on their adherence to the current guidelines for Pap testing every three years. Acceptability of self-sample HPV testing was high, with over 85% of participants reporting that they would be willing to use the test if available. A smaller proportion (58%) was deemed likely to accept self-sample HPV testing in a public ED restroom setting. Primary concerns expressed by women were that the sampling may not be done correctly (64%) and that they may not know how to perform the sampling (39%).

CONCLUSIONS:

Opportunistic self-sample HPV testing is acceptable to women seeking care at a high-volume, urban emergency care center. The use of this intervention potentially offers a unique strategy to improve cervical cancer screening among high-risk women who otherwise do not attend for regular screening.

KEYWORDS:

Cervical cancer screening; Emergency departments; Human papillomavirus; Self-testing

PMID:
26026733
DOI:
10.1016/j.ygyno.2015.05.028
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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