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J Appl Physiol (1985). 2015 Jul 15;119(2):116-23. doi: 10.1152/japplphysiol.00101.2015. Epub 2015 May 28.

Oxidative capacity and glycogen content increase more in arm than leg muscle in sedentary women after intense training.

Author information

1
Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, Section of Human Physiology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark;
2
Sport and Health Sciences, College of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Exeter, Exeter, United Kingdom;
3
Department of Occupational Medicine and Public Health, The Faroese Hospital System, Tórshavn, Faroe Islands;
4
Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Molise, Molise, Italy;
5
Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, Section of Human Physiology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark; Sport and Health Sciences, College of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Exeter, Exeter, United Kingdom;
6
Copenhagen Muscle Research Centre, Rigshopsitalet and University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark;
7
Faculty of Natural and Health Sciences, University of the Faroe Islands, Tórshavn, Faroe Islands; and Center of Health and Human Performance, Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden magnim@setur.fo.

Abstract

The hypothesis that the adaptive capacity is higher in human upper- than lower-body skeletal muscle was tested. Furthermore, the hypothesis that more pronounced adaptations in upper-body musculature can be achieved by "low-volume high-intensity" compared with "high-volume low-intensity" exercise training was evaluated. A group of sedentary premenopausal women aged 45 ± 6 yr (± SD) with expected high adaptive potential in both upper- and lower-extremity muscle groups participated. After random allocation to high-intensity swimming (HIS, n = 21), moderate-intensity swimming (MOS, n = 21), soccer (SOC, n = 21) or a nontraining control group (CON, n = 20), the training groups completed three workouts per week for 15 wk. Resting muscle biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis muscle and deltoideus muscle before and after the intervention. After the training intervention, a larger (P < 0.05) increase existed in deltoideus muscle of the HIS group compared with vastus lateralis muscle of the SOC group for citrate synthase maximal activity (95 ± 89 vs. 27 ± 34%), citrate synthase protein expression (100 ± 29 vs. 31 ± 44%), 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase maximal activity (35 ± 43 vs. 3 ± 25%), muscle glycogen content (63 ± 76 vs. 20 ± 51%), and expression of mitochondrial complex II, III, and IV. Additionally, HIS caused higher (P < 0.05) increases than MOS in deltoideus muscle citrate synthase maximal activity, citrate synthase protein expression, and muscle glycogen content. In conclusion, the deltoideus muscle has a higher adaptive potential than the vastus lateralis muscle in sedentary women, and "high-intensity low-volume" training is a more efficient regime than "low-intensity high-volume" training for increasing the aerobic capacity of the deltoideus muscle.

KEYWORDS:

health; lean body mass; metabolism; mitochondria; performance; soccer; swimming

PMID:
26023221
DOI:
10.1152/japplphysiol.00101.2015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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