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Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2015 Oct;22(20):15703-11. doi: 10.1007/s11356-015-4762-6. Epub 2015 May 29.

Indoor air quality in a restaurant kitchen using margarine for deep-frying.

Author information

1
Department of Chemical Engineering, Izmir Institute of Technology, Gulbahce, Urla, 35430, Izmir, Turkey. cemilsofuoglu@iyte.edu.tr.
2
Department of Environmental Engineering, Izmir Institute of Technology, Gulbahce, Urla, 35430, Izmir, Turkey. cemilsofuoglu@iyte.edu.tr.
3
Environmental Engineering Graduate Program, Izmir Institute of Technology, Gulbahce, Urla, 35430, Izmir, Turkey.
4
Department of Chemical Engineering, Izmir Institute of Technology, Gulbahce, Urla, 35430, Izmir, Turkey.
5
Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Dokuz Eylül University, Balçova, 35340, İzmir, Turkey.

Abstract

Indoor air quality has a great impact on human health. Cooking, in particular frying, is one of the most important sources of indoor air pollution. Indoor air CO, CO2, particulate matter (PM), and volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations, including aldehydes, were measured in the kitchen of a small establishment where a special deep-frying margarine was used. The objective was to assess occupational exposure concentrations for cooks of such restaurants. While individual VOC and PM2.5 concentrations were measured before, during, and after frying events using active sampling, TVOC, PM10, CO, CO2, temperature, and relative humidity were continuously monitored through the whole period. VOC and aldehyde concentrations did not increase to considerable levels with deep-frying compared to the background and public indoor environment levels, whereas PM10 increased significantly (1.85 to 6.6 folds). The average PM2.5 concentration of the whole period ranged between 76 and 249 μg/m(3). Hence, considerable PM exposures could occur during deep-frying with the special margarine, which might be sufficiently high to cause health effects on cooks considering their chronic occupational exposures.

KEYWORDS:

Deep-frying; Indoor air quality; Kitchen; Margarine; Restaurant

PMID:
26022397
DOI:
10.1007/s11356-015-4762-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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