Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Respir Res. 2015 May 29;16:64. doi: 10.1186/s12931-015-0223-5.

Nanotechnology in respiratory medicine.

Author information

1
Department of Experimental Pneumology and Allergology, Saarland University Hospital and Saarland University Faculty of Medicine, Kirrberger Strasse, Geb. 61.4, 66421, Homburg/Saar, Germany.
2
Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, SUNY Buffalo, New York, USA.
3
Department of Internal Medicine V, Pneumology, Allergology and Respiratory Critical Care Medicine, Saarland University Faculty of Medicine, Homburg/Saar, Germany.
4
Department of Experimental Pneumology and Allergology, Saarland University Hospital and Saarland University Faculty of Medicine, Kirrberger Strasse, Geb. 61.4, 66421, Homburg/Saar, Germany. Thai.Dinh@uniklinikum-saarland.de.
5
Department of Internal Medicine V, Pneumology, Allergology and Respiratory Critical Care Medicine, Saarland University Faculty of Medicine, Homburg/Saar, Germany. Thai.Dinh@uniklinikum-saarland.de.

Abstract

Like two sides of the same coin, nanotechnology can be both boon and bane for respiratory medicine. Nanomaterials open new ways in diagnostics and treatment of lung diseases. Nanoparticle based drug delivery systems can help against diseases such as lung cancer, tuberculosis, and pulmonary fibrosis. Moreover, nanoparticles can be loaded with DNA and act as vectors for gene therapy in diseases like cystic fibrosis. Even lung diagnostics with computer tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) profits from new nanoparticle based contrast agents. However, the risks of nanotechnology also have to be taken into consideration as engineered nanomaterials resemble natural fine dusts and fibers, which are known to be harmful for the respiratory system in many cases. Recent studies have shown that nanoparticles in the respiratory tract can influence the immune system, can create oxidative stress and even cause genotoxicity. Another important aspect to assess the safety of nanotechnology based products is the absorption of nanoparticles. It was demonstrated that the amount of pulmonary nanoparticle uptake not only depends on physical and chemical nanoparticle characteristics but also on the health status of the organism. The huge diversity in nanotechnology could revolutionize medicine but makes safety assessment a challenging task.

PMID:
26021823
PMCID:
PMC4456054
DOI:
10.1186/s12931-015-0223-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for BioMed Central Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center