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J Anim Sci. 2015 Apr;93(4):1710-20. doi: 10.2527/jas.2014-8600.

Effects of feeding cracked corn to nursery and finishing pigs.

Abstract

Four experiments were conducted to determine the effects of supplementing cracked corn in nursery and finishing pig diets (PIC TR4 × 1050). In Exp. 1, 144 pigs (7.5 kg BW) were used in a 28-d experiment with 6 pigs per pen and 6 pens per treatment. Treatments were corn-soybean meal based in the form of mash, pellets (PCD), and pellets with 100% of the corn ground (PGr; 618 mm) or cracked (PCr; 3444 mm) and blended into the diet after the rest of the formulation had been pelleted. For d 0 to 28, pigs fed mash had increased (P = 0.042) ADFI compared with those fed the PCD diet. Pigs fed PCD had increased (P < 0.05) ADG and G:F compared with pigs fed PGr and PCr. Pigs fed PCr had decreased (P = 0.004) G:F compared with those fed PGr. For Exp. 2, 224 nursery pigs (7.4 kg BW) were used in a 28-d study with 7 pigs per pen and 8 pens per treatment. Treatments were similar to Exp. 1, with 50% of the corn either ground (445 mm) or cracked (2142 mm). For d 0 to 28, pigs fed mash had greater (P < 0.05) ADFI and G:F than pigs fed the PCD diet. Pigs fed the PCD diet had decreased (P = 0.001) ADFI and increased (P = 0.001) G:F compared to those fed PGr and PCr. For Exp. 3, 208 pigs (62.6 kg BW) were used in a 63-d experiment with 13 pigs per pen and 4 pens per treatment. Treatments were corn-soybean meal based with 0, 10, 20, and 40% cracked corn (3549 µm). All treatments were fed in mash form. For d 0 to 63, increasing cracked corn tended to decrease (linear, P = 0.093) G:F and decreased (linear, P = 0.047) carcass yield. Adding up to 40% of cracked corn to a mash diet decreased (P < 0.05) scores for keratinization and ulcers. For Exp. 4, 252 finishing pigs (40 kg BW) were used with 7 pigs per pen and 9 pens per treatment. The treatments were the same as described in Exp. 2. For the 80-d experiment, pigs fed mash had decreased (P < 0.05) ADG, stomach keratinization, and ulcer scores and increased (P < 0.05) yield and loin depth compared with pigs fed the PCD diet. Pigs fed PCD had increased (P < 0.05) ADG and G:F and decreased (P = 0.026) loin depth compared with pigs fed PGr and PCr diets. Pigs fed PCr had increased (P = 0.023) ADG and decreased (P = 0.001) yield compared with pigs fed PGr. Pigs fed PCr had decreased (P < 0.05) stomach keratinization and ulcer scores compared with pigs fed the PCD and PGr diets. In conclusion, pigs fed PCD had the greatest G:F, and PGr and PCr treatments had negative effects on G:F of pigs. Scores for stomach lesions were lowest for pigs fed PCr.

PMID:
26020193
DOI:
10.2527/jas.2014-8600
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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