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Acta Paediatr. 2015 Sep;104(9):e388-94. doi: 10.1111/apa.13053. Epub 2015 Jun 22.

Lenticulostriated vasculopathy is a high-risk marker for hearing loss in congenital cytomegalovirus infections.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics C, Schneider Children's Medical Center, Petah Tiqva, Israel.
2
Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.
3
Department of Pediatric Radiology, Schneider Children's Medical Center, Petah Tiqva, Israel.
4
Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Rabin Medical Center, Beilinson Hospital, Petah Tiqva, Israel.
5
Institute of Audiology and Clinical Neurophysiology, Schneider Children's Medical Center, Petah Tiqva, Israel.
6
Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel.
7
Infectious Diseases Unit, Schneider Children's Medical Center, Petah Tiqva, Israel.
8
Day Hospitalization Unit, Schneider Children's Medical Center, Petah Tiqva, Israel.

Abstract

AIM:

This study investigated the relationship between lenticulostriated vasculopathy (LSV) and hearing loss in 141 infants with congenital cytomegalovirus (cCMV) infection.

METHODS:

We included all infants with cCMV infection who were followed in our clinic for more than a year with only LSV signs of brain involvement on initial brain ultrasound. Group one comprised 13 infants with no hearing impairment at birth who were not treated with gan/valganciclovir during 2006-2009. Group two was 51 infants with LSV and no hearing impairment who had been treated since mid-2009. Group three was 25 infants born with LSV and hearing loss, who had been treated from birth. Group four was 52 control infants born during the same period with asymptomatic cCMV. Hearing tests were performed during the neonatal period and every four to six months until four years of age.

RESULTS:

Hearing deterioration was more extensive in group one (85%) than in group two (0%, p < 0.001) and the asymptomatic group (10%, p < 0.001) and occurred more often in group four (10%) than in group two (0%, p = 0.008).

CONCLUSION:

Lenticulostriated vasculopathy was common in infants with cCMV infection and may serve as a sign of central nervous system involvement and further hearing deterioration. Antiviral treatment may be prudent in such infants.

KEYWORDS:

Brain; Congenital infection; Cytomegalovirus; Hearing loss; Lenticulostriated vasculopathy

PMID:
26018986
DOI:
10.1111/apa.13053
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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