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BMC Fam Pract. 2015 May 28;16:67. doi: 10.1186/s12875-015-0284-z.

"Keeping Moving": factors associated with sedentary behaviour among older people recruited to an exercise promotion trial in general practice.

Author information

1
Department of Primary Care & Population Health, University College London, Royal Free Campus, Rowland Hill St., London, NW3 2PF, UK. ruth_heseltine@hotmail.com.
2
School of Health & Life Sciences, Glasgow Caledonian University, Cowcaddens Rd, Glasgow, Lanarkshire, G4 0BA, UK. dawn.skelton@gcu.ac.uk.
3
Division of Primary Care, University of Nottingham, Floor 13, Tower Building, University Park, Nottingham, NG7 2RD, UK. denise.kendrick@nottingham.ac.uk.
4
School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Canynge Hall, 39 Whatley Road, Bristol, BS8 2PS, UK. richard.morris@bristol.ac.uk.
5
Department of Primary Care & Population Health, University College London, Royal Free Campus, Rowland Hill St., London, NW3 2PF, UK. m.griffin@ucl.ac.uk.
6
Department of Primary Care & Population Health, University College London, Royal Free Campus, Rowland Hill St., London, NW3 2PF, UK. d.haworth@ucl.ac.uk.
7
Nottingham University Hospital NHS Trust, Derby Rd, Nottingham, NG7 2UH, UK. tash.masud@nottingham.ac.uk.
8
Department of Primary Care & Population Health, University College London, Royal Free Campus, Rowland Hill St., London, NW3 2PF, UK. s.iliffe@ucl.ac.uk.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Sedentary behaviour is detrimental to health, even in those who achieve recommended levels of physical activity. Efforts to increase physical activity in older people so that they reach beneficial levels have been disappointing. Reducing sedentary behaviour may improve health and be less demanding of older people, but it is not clear how to achieve this. We explored the characteristics of sedentary older people enrolled into an exercise promotion trial to gain insights about those who were sedentary but wanted to increase activity.

METHOD:

Participants in the ProAct65+ trial (2009-2013) were categorised as sedentary or not using a self-report questionnaire. Demographic data, health status, self-rated function and physical test performance were examined for each group. 1104 participants aged 65 & over were included in the secondary analysis of trial data from older people recruited via general practice. Results were analysed using logistic regression with stepwise backward elimination.

RESULTS:

Three hundred eighty seven (35 %) of the study sample were characterised as sedentary. The likelihood of being categorised as sedentary increased with an abnormal BMI (<18.5 or >25 g/m(2)) (Odds Ratio 1.740, CI 1.248-2.425), ever smoking (OR 1.420, CI 1.042-1.934) and with every additional medication prescribed (OR 1.069, CI 1.016-1.124). Participants reporting better self-rated physical health (SF-12) were less likely to be sedentary; (OR 0.961, 0.936-0.987). Participants' sedentary behaviour was not associated with gender, age, income, education, falls, functional fitness, quality of life or number of co-morbidities.

CONCLUSION:

Some sedentary older adults will respond positively to an invitation to join an exercise study. Those who did so in this study had poor self-rated health, abnormal BMI, a history of smoking, and multiple medication use, and are therefore likely to benefit from an exercise intervention.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ISRCTN reference: ISRCTN43453770.

PMID:
26018127
PMCID:
PMC4446807
DOI:
10.1186/s12875-015-0284-z
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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