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Am J Health Behav. 2015 Jul;39(4):549-55. doi: 10.5993/AJHB.39.4.11.

Mental illness and substance use problems in relation to homelessness onset.

Author information

1
The University of Houston, College of Education, Department of Psychological, Health, and Learning Sciences, Houston, TX, USA.
2
The University of Houston, College of Education, Department of Psychological, Health, and Learning Sciences, Houston, TX, USA; Affiliated with The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, TX, USA. Lrreitzel@uh.edu.
3
The University of Texas Health Science Center, School of Nursing, Houston, TX, USA.
4
The University of Texas Health Science Center, School of Public Health, Dallas, TX, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The relationships among youth (≤ 24 years) versus adult (>24 years) homelessness onset, lifetime serious mental illness, and substance use problems is not well understood. We sought to explore these associations among 394 homeless adults, 124 of whom reported youth-onset homelessness.

METHODS:

Covariate-adjusted logistic regression analyses evaluated the associations among homelessness onset, serious mental illness, and self-reported substance use problems.

RESULTS:

Youth-onset homelessness was associated with greater likelihood of serious mental illness and sedative problems, and a lower likelihood of cocaine problems, in adjusted analyses (p values ≤ .04).

CONCLUSIONS:

Serious mental illness and sedative problems may characterize homeless youth who are vulnerable to adulthood homelessness, although longitudinal cohort studies are needed to explicate temporal relations between variables.

PMID:
26018103
DOI:
10.5993/AJHB.39.4.11
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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