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PLoS One. 2015 May 27;10(5):e0127533. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0127533. eCollection 2015.

Transnational corporations as 'keystone actors' in marine ecosystems.

Author information

1
Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, 106 91, Stockholm, Sweden.
2
Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, 106 91, Stockholm, Sweden; Global Economic Dynamics and the Biosphere Academy Programme, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, PO Box 50005, 104 05, Stockholm, Sweden.
3
Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, 106 91, Stockholm, Sweden; Global Economic Dynamics and the Biosphere Academy Programme, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, PO Box 50005, 104 05, Stockholm, Sweden; Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, PO Box 50005, 104 05, Stockholm, Sweden.
4
Global Economic Dynamics and the Biosphere Academy Programme, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, PO Box 50005, 104 05, Stockholm, Sweden; Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, PO Box 50005, 104 05, Stockholm, Sweden.

Abstract

Keystone species have a disproportionate influence on the structure and function of ecosystems. Here we analyze whether a keystone-like pattern can be observed in the relationship between transnational corporations and marine ecosystems globally. We show how thirteen corporations control 11-16% of the global marine catch (9-13 million tons) and 19-40% of the largest and most valuable stocks, including species that play important roles in their respective ecosystem. They dominate all segments of seafood production, operate through an extensive global network of subsidiaries and are profoundly involved in fisheries and aquaculture decision-making. Based on our findings, we define these companies as keystone actors of the Anthropocene. The phenomenon of keystone actors represents an increasingly important feature of the human-dominated world. Sustainable leadership by keystone actors could result in cascading effects throughout the entire seafood industry and enable a critical transition towards improved management of marine living resources and ecosystems.

PMID:
26017777
PMCID:
PMC4446349
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0127533
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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