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Indian J Orthop. 2015 Mar-Apr;49(2):181-6. doi: 10.4103/0019-5413.152462.

Fate of bone grafting for acetabular defects in total hip replacement.

Author information

1
Department of Orthopaedics, Unit 2, Christian Medical College and Hospital, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The use of allografts and autografts in the management of acetabular defects have been reported with varying results. Trabecular metal is an expensive option in the management of these defects. This study aims to assess the fate and efficacy of bone grafting for acetabular bone defects in total hip arthroplasty.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

A total of 30 hips in 28 patients with acetabular deficiencies were treated with bone grafting and total hip replacement (THR). Seventeen hips had American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons (AAOS) type 2 (Paprosky type 2c) deficiency and 13 had AAOS type 3 (Paprosky type 3a) defects of the acetabulum. Allografts were used in 15 patients and autografts were used in the remaining 13. Cemented total hip arthroplasty was done in 18 hips and uncemented THR in 12. Seven patients underwent the procedure for, acetabular erosion and symptoms following hemiarthroplasty (4 out of 7), or, acetabular revision for failure (3 out of 7) following total hip arthroplasty. Acetabular deficiencies in other patients were due to posttraumatic causes, advanced primary hip arthritis and second stage treatment of postinfective arthritis. A mesh was used in 6 hips and screws were used in 13 hips for graft fixation.

RESULTS:

Patients were followed up clinicoradiologically for a period of 10 months to 4 years (mean 23.4 months). One patient required staged revision due to infection. Two patients had early asymptomatic cup migration. One patient had graft lysis and change in cup inclination with persistent pain. He was not keen on further intervention at last followup. Other patients were pain free at the time of followup with radiographs showing maintenance of graft and implant position.

CONCLUSION:

Bone grafting is a suitable option in the management of acetabular defects in total hip arthroplasty, especially in resource challenged countries.

KEYWORDS:

Acetabulum; bone; bone grafts; defects; grafting; hip; protrusio; reconstruction; replacement

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