Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Am J Kidney Dis. 2015 Sep;66(3):513-22. doi: 10.1053/j.ajkd.2015.04.013. Epub 2015 May 23.

Recent Advances in Traditional Chinese Medicine for Kidney Disease.

Author information

1
Department of Nephrology, Longhua Hospital, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai, China. Electronic address: yifeilily@126.com.
2
Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY.
3
Department of Nephrology, Longhua Hospital, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai, China.
4
Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY. Electronic address: cijiang.he@mssm.edu.

Abstract

Because current treatment options for chronic kidney disease (CKD) are limited, many patients seek out alternative therapies such as traditional Chinese medicine. However, there is a lack of evidence from large clinical trials to support the use of traditional medicines in patients with CKD. Many active components of traditional medicine formulas are undetermined and their toxicities are unknown. Therefore, there is a need for research to identify active compounds from traditional medicines and understand the mechanisms of action of these compounds, as well as their potential toxicity, and subsequently perform well-designed, randomized, controlled, clinical trials to study the efficacy and safety of their use in patients with CKD. Significant progress has been made in this field within the last several years. Many active compounds have been identified by applying sophisticated techniques such as mass spectrometry, and more mechanistic studies of these compounds have been performed using both in vitro and in vivo models. In addition, several well-designed, large, randomized, clinical trials have recently been published. We summarize these recent advances in the field of traditional medicines as they apply to CKD. In addition, current barriers for further research are also discussed. Due to the ongoing research in this field, we believe that stronger evidence to support the use of traditional medicines for CKD will emerge in the near future.

KEYWORDS:

Chronic kidney disease (CKD); alternative medicine; animal models; anti-fibrotic; anti-inflammatory; anti-oxidant; clinical trials; glomerular disease; herbal medicine; immunomodulation; inflammation; renal disease; review; traditional Chinese medicine (TCM)

PMID:
26015275
DOI:
10.1053/j.ajkd.2015.04.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center