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Sci Rep. 2015 May 27;5:10533. doi: 10.1038/srep10533.

Landscape of the lipidome and transcriptome under heat stress in Arabidopsis thaliana.

Author information

1
RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science, 1-7-22 Suehiro-cho, Tsurumi-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 230-0045, Japan.
2
1] RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science, 1-7-22 Suehiro-cho, Tsurumi-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 230-0045, Japan [2] Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University, Inohana 1-8-1, Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8675, Japan.

Abstract

Environmental stress causes membrane damage in plants. Lipid studies are required to understand the adaptation of plants to climate change. Here, LC-MS-based lipidomic and microarray transcriptome analyses were carried out to elucidate the effect of short-term heat stress on the Arabidopsis thaliana leaf membrane. Vegetative plants were subjected to high temperatures for one day, and then grown under normal conditions. Sixty-six detected glycerolipid species were classified according to patterns of compositional change by Spearman's correlation coefficient. Triacylglycerols, 36:4- and 36:5-monogalactosyldiacylglycerol, 34:2- and 36:2-digalactosyldiacylglycerol, 34:1-, 36:1- and 36:6-phosphatidylcholine, and 34:1-phosphatidylethanolamine increased by the stress and immediately decreased during recovery. The relative amount of one triacylglycerol species (54:9) containing α-linolenic acid (18:3) increased under heat stress. These results suggest that heat stress in Arabidopsis leaves induces an increase in triacylglycerol levels, which functions as an intermediate of lipid turnover, and results in a decrease in membrane polyunsaturated fatty acids. Microarray data revealed candidate genes responsible for the observed metabolic changes.

PMID:
26013835
PMCID:
PMC4444972
DOI:
10.1038/srep10533
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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