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J Minim Invasive Gynecol. 2015 Sep-Oct;22(6):1022-8. doi: 10.1016/j.jmig.2015.05.016. Epub 2015 May 23.

Pregnancy Outcomes and Risk Factors for Uterine Rupture After Laparoscopic Myomectomy: A Single-Center Experience and Literature Review.

Author information

1
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Korea University Guro Hospital, Seoul, Korea.
2
Cheil General Hospital and Women's Healthcare Center, Dankook University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
3
Cheil General Hospital and Women's Healthcare Center, Dankook University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. Electronic address: kimonc@hotmail.com.

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate pregnancy outcomes after laparoscopic myomectomy (LSM), focusing on the risk of uterine rupture.

DESIGN:

Retrospective cohort study (Canadian Task Force classification III).

SETTING:

University hospital.

PATIENTS:

Of 676 women who visited the obstetrics department for a pregnancy after undergoing LSM performed at the same center between 1994 and 2012, we included the 523 women who had follow-up through the end of pregnancy.

INTERVENTIONS:

All patients underwent LSM, and their medical charts were retrospectively reviewed.

MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS:

Multiple myomas were removed in 35.2% of cases, intramural-type lesions occurred in 46.5% of cases, and the mean myoma diameter was 4.9 cm. Pregnancy outcomes after LSM included 400 (76.5%) full-term deliveries and 100 (19.1%) vaginal deliveries, with other adverse outcomes being no different than the general population. The mean interval between LSM and pregnancy was 14 months, and only 3 (0.6%) cases of uterine rupture occurred during pregnancy. In analysis, by reviewing the published cases of uterine rupture, we found that the mean diameter, myoma number and type, and the rate of uterine suture were similar between the ruptured cases and all of our cases of LSM.

CONCLUSION:

LSM can be safely used in women of reproductive age who want to become pregnant. Uterine rupture occurs in rare cases, regardless of myoma features, but further large-scale studies are required to ascertain the detailed effects of various surgical techniques.

KEYWORDS:

Laparoscopic myomectomy; Pregnancy outcome; Uterine rupture

Comment in

PMID:
26012718
DOI:
10.1016/j.jmig.2015.05.016
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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