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J Trace Elem Med Biol. 2015;31:113-9. doi: 10.1016/j.jtemb.2015.04.004. Epub 2015 Apr 22.

Plasma levels of trace elements and exercise induced stress hormones in well-trained athletes.

Author information

1
Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Zaragoza, C/Domingo Miral, s/n, 50009 Zaragoza, Spain. Electronic address: msoria@unizar.es.
2
Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Zaragoza, C/Domingo Miral, s/n, 50009 Zaragoza, Spain. Electronic address: ghcarlos@gmail.com.
3
Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Zaragoza, C/Domingo Miral, s/n, 50009 Zaragoza, Spain.
4
Toxicology Service, Hospital Central de la Defensa, Glorieta del Ejército, s/n, 28047 Madrid, Spain. Electronic address: jlopcol@oc.mde.es.
5
Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Zaragoza, C/Domingo Miral, s/n, 50009 Zaragoza, Spain. Electronic address: escanero@unizar.es.

Abstract

This study analyzed the variation and relationship of several trace elements, metabolic substrates and stress hormones activated by exercise during incremental exercise. Seventeen well-trained endurance athletes performed a cycle ergometer test: after a warm-up of 10 min at 2.0 W kg(-1), the workload was increased by 0.5 W kg(-1) every 10 min until exhaustion. Prior diet, activity patterns, and levels of exercise training were controlled, and tests timed to minimize variations due to the circadian rhythm. Oxygen uptake, blood lactate concentration, plasma ions (Zn, Se, Mn and Co), serum glucose, non-esterified fatty acids (NEFAs) and several hormones were measured at rest, at the end of each stage and 3, 5 and 7 min post-exercise. Urine specific gravity was measured before and after the test, and participants drank water ad libitum. Significant differences were found in plasma Zn and Se levels as a function of exercise intensity. Zn was significantly correlated with epinephrine, norepinephrine and cortisol (r = 0.884, P < 0.01; r = 0.871, P < 0.01; and r = 0.808, P = 0.05); and Se showed significant positive correlations whit epinephrine and cortisol (r = 0.743, P < 0.05; and r = 0.776, P < 0.05). Neither Zn nor Se levels were associated with insulin or glucagon, and neither Mn nor Co levels were associated with any of the hormones or substrate metabolites studied. Further, while Zn levels were found to be associated only with lactate, plasma Se was significantly correlated with lactate and glucose (respectively for Zn: r = 0.891, P < 0.01; and for Se: r = 0.743, P < 0.05; r = 0.831, P < 0.05). In conclusion, our data suggest that there is a positive correlation between the increases in plasma Zn or Se and stress hormones variations induced by exercise along different submaximal intensities in well-hydrated well-trained endurance athletes.

KEYWORDS:

Exercise intensity; Lactate; Plasma trace elements; Stress hormones

PMID:
26004901
DOI:
10.1016/j.jtemb.2015.04.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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