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J Assist Reprod Genet. 2015 Jul;32(7):1009-17. doi: 10.1007/s10815-015-0495-1. Epub 2015 May 24.

Lack of carbon air filtration impacts early embryo development.

Author information

1
Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA, 52242, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To assess human fertilization and preimplantation embryo development in the presence and in the absence of carbon filtration

METHODS:

This is a retrospective cohort analysis of fresh, controlled ovarian hyperstimulation cycles as well as previously cryopreserved pronuclear stage embryo transfer cycles in a single IVF center. Embryo development and cycle-based outcomes were compared among three groups: 1) when carbon filtration was present, 2) when carbon filtration was absent, and 3) when carbon filtration had been restored.

RESULTS:

A total of 524 fresh cycles and 156 cryopreserved embryo cycles were analyzed. Fertilization, cleavage, and blastocyst conversion rates for fresh cycles all declined during the period of absent carbon filtration and recovered after the restoration of carbon filtration. Cryopreserved embryos that were thawed and cultured during the period of absent filtration did not have changes in cleavage or blastocyst conversion rates compared to periods where carbon filtration was present. Clinical pregnancy and live birth rates were unchanged among the three time periods.

CONCLUSIONS:

The absence of carbon filtration in an IVF laboratory air handler is associated with poor fertilization and early embryo development for fresh cycles. Because development of previously frozen pronuclear stage embryos was unaffected, the lack of carbon filtration may preferentially affect embryos in the peri-fertilization period. Carbon filtration is an integral part to a successful human in-vitro fertilization laboratory.

PMID:
26003657
PMCID:
PMC4531868
DOI:
10.1007/s10815-015-0495-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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