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Card Electrophysiol Clin. 2015 Jun;7(2):341-55. doi: 10.1016/j.ccep.2015.03.013. Epub 2015 Apr 1.

QT Prolongation and Oncology Drug Development.

Author information

1
Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Morsani College of Medicine, University of South Florida, 2 Tampa General Circle, Tampa, FL 33606, USA. Electronic address: mfradley@health.usf.edu.
2
Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, 2220 Pierce Avenue, Nashville, TN 37232, USA; Division of Hematology-Oncology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, 2220 Pierce Avenue, Nashville, TN 37232, USA; Cardio-Oncology Program, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, 2220 Pierce Avenue, Nashville, TN 37232, USA.

Abstract

Many pharmaceutical agents interact with cardiac ion channels resulting in abnormal ventricular repolarization and prolongation of the QT interval. In rare circumstances, this has resulted in the development of the potentially life-threatening arrhythmia, torsades de pointes. It is recognized, however, that accurate measurement of the QT interval is challenging, and it is a poor predictor for the development of this arrhythmia. Nevertheless, QT interval monitoring is an essential part of pharmaceutical development, and significant increases in the QT interval may prevent a drug from gaining approval.

KEYWORDS:

Cancer treatment; Cardio-oncology; Cardiotoxicity; Chemotherapy; QT prolongation; Torsades de pointes

PMID:
26002398
DOI:
10.1016/j.ccep.2015.03.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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