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J Am Acad Dermatol. 2015 Jul;73(1):83-92.e1. doi: 10.1016/j.jaad.2015.02.1112. Epub 2015 May 19.

Patterns of sunscreen use on the face and other exposed skin among US adults.

Author information

1
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, Atlanta, Georgia. Electronic address: dholman@cdc.gov.
2
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, Atlanta, Georgia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Sunscreen is a common form of sun protection, but little is known about patterns of use.

OBJECTIVE:

We sought to assess patterns of sunscreen use on the face and other exposed skin among US adults.

METHODS:

Using cross-sectional data from the 2013 Summer ConsumerStyles survey (N = 4033), we calculated descriptive statistics and adjusted risk ratios to identify characteristics associated with regular sunscreen use (always/most of the time when outside on a warm sunny day for ≥1 hour).

RESULTS:

Few adults regularly used sunscreen on the face (men: 18.1%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 15.8-20.6; women: 42.6%, 95% CI 39.5-46.7), other exposed skin (men: 19.9%, 95% CI 17.5-22.6; women: 34.4%, 95% CI 31.5-37.5), or both the face and other exposed skin (men: 14.3%, 95% CI 12.3-16.6; women: 29.9%, 95% CI 27.2-32.8). Regular use was associated with sun-sensitive skin, an annual household income ≥$60,000, and meeting aerobic activity guidelines (Ps < .05). Nearly 40% of users were unsure if their sunscreen provided broad-spectrum protection.

LIMITATIONS:

Reliance on self-report and lack of information on sunscreen reapplication or other sun-safety practices are limitations.

CONCLUSION:

Sunscreen use is low, especially among certain demographic groups. These findings can inform sun-safety interventions and the interpretation of surveillance data on sunscreen use.

KEYWORDS:

broad spectrum; skin cancer prevention; sun protection; sun protection factor; sun safety; sunscreen

PMID:
26002066
PMCID:
PMC4475428
DOI:
10.1016/j.jaad.2015.02.1112
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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