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Cell. 2015 May 21;161(5):971-987. doi: 10.1016/j.cell.2015.05.019.

Using Genome-scale Models to Predict Biological Capabilities.

Author information

1
Department of Bioengineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA; Bioinformatics and Systems Biology Program, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA.
2
Department of Bioengineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA; Department of NanoEngineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA.
3
Department of Bioengineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA; Department of Pediatrics, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA; Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Biosustainability, Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby 2800, Denmark. Electronic address: palsson@ucsd.edu.

Abstract

Constraint-based reconstruction and analysis (COBRA) methods at the genome scale have been under development since the first whole-genome sequences appeared in the mid-1990s. A few years ago, this approach began to demonstrate the ability to predict a range of cellular functions, including cellular growth capabilities on various substrates and the effect of gene knockouts at the genome scale. Thus, much interest has developed in understanding and applying these methods to areas such as metabolic engineering, antibiotic design, and organismal and enzyme evolution. This Primer will get you started.

PMID:
26000478
PMCID:
PMC4451052
DOI:
10.1016/j.cell.2015.05.019
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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