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Am J Prev Med. 2015 Aug;49(2):259-63. doi: 10.1016/j.amepre.2015.02.007. Epub 2015 May 18.

Pre-screening Discussions and Prostate-Specific Antigen Testing for Prostate Cancer Screening.

Author information

1
Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, CDC, Atlanta, Georgia. Electronic address: ffa2@cdc.gov.
2
Division of Population Health (Zhao), National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, CDC, Atlanta, Georgia.
3
Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, CDC, Atlanta, Georgia.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

For many men, the net benefit of prostate cancer screening with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) tests may be small. Many major medical organizations have issued recommendations for prostate cancer screening, stressing the need for shared decision making before ordering a test. The purpose of this study is to better understand associations between discussions about benefits and harms of PSA testing and uptake of the test among men aged ≥40 years.

METHODS:

Associations between pre-screening discussions and PSA testing were examined using self-reported data from the 2012 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Unadjusted prevalence of PSA testing was estimated and AORs were calculated using logistic regression in 2014.

RESULTS:

The multivariate analysis showed that men who had ever discussed advantages of PSA testing only or discussed both advantages and disadvantages were more likely, respectively, to report having had a test within the past year than men who had no discussions (p<0.001). In addition, men who had only discussed the disadvantages of PSA testing with their healthcare providers were more likely (AOR=2.75, 95% CI=2.00, 3.79) to report getting tested than men who had no discussions.

CONCLUSIONS:

Discussions of the benefits or harms of PSA testing are positively associated with increased uptake of the test. Given the conflicting recommendations for prostate cancer screening and increasing importance of shared decision making, this study points to the need for understanding how pre-screening discussions are being conducted in clinical practice and the role played by patients' values and preferences in decisions about PSA testing.

PMID:
25997905
PMCID:
PMC4536805
DOI:
10.1016/j.amepre.2015.02.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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