Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Curr Opin Immunol. 2015 Aug;35:1-8. doi: 10.1016/j.coi.2015.05.001. Epub 2015 May 18.

HIV therapeutic vaccines: moving towards a functional cure.

Author information

1
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA; Emory Vaccine Center, Yerkes National Primate Research Center, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30329, USA.
2
Emory Vaccine Center, Yerkes National Primate Research Center, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30329, USA; Department of Pathology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA.
3
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA; Emory Vaccine Center, Yerkes National Primate Research Center, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30329, USA. Electronic address: ramara@emory.edu.

Abstract

Anti-viral T-cell and B-cell responses play a crucial role in suppressing HIV and SIV replication during chronic infection. However, these infections are rarely controlled by the host immune response, and most infected individuals need lifelong antiretroviral therapy (ART). Recent advances in our understanding of how anti-HIV immune responses are elicited and regulated prompted a surge of interest in harnessing these responses to reduce the HIV 'residual disease' that is present in ART-treated HIV-infected individuals. Novel approaches that are currently explored include both conventional therapeutic vaccines (i.e., active immunization strategies using HIV-derived immunogens) as well as the use of checkpoint blockers such as anti-PD-1 antibodies. These approaches appear promising as key components of complex therapeutic strategies aimed at curing HIV infection.

PMID:
25996629
PMCID:
PMC4553139
DOI:
10.1016/j.coi.2015.05.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center