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Nutrients. 2015 May 19;7(5):3796-812. doi: 10.3390/nu7053796.

Improved blood biomarkers but no cognitive effects from 16 weeks of multivitamin supplementation in healthy older adults.

Author information

1
Centre for Human Psychopharmacology, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, VIC 3122, Australia. eharris@swin.edu.au.
2
Centre for Human Psychopharmacology, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, VIC 3122, Australia. helen.macpherson@deakin.edu.au.
3
Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition Research, School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Deakin University, Burwood, VIC 3125, Australia. helen.macpherson@deakin.edu.au.
4
Centre for Human Psychopharmacology, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, VIC 3122, Australia. apipingas@swin.edu.au.

Abstract

Supplementation with vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients may be beneficial for cognition, especially in older adults. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of multivitamin supplementation in older adults on cognitive function and associated blood biomarkers. In a randomised, double blind, placebo-controlled trial, healthy women (n = 68) and men (n = 48) aged 55-65 years were supplemented daily for 16 weeks with women's and men's formula multivitamin supplements. Assessments at baseline and post-supplementation included computerised cognitive tasks and blood biomarkers relevant to cognitive aging. No cognitive improvements were observed after supplementation with either formula; however, several significant improvements were observed in blood biomarkers including increased levels of vitamins B6 and B12 in women and men; reduced C-reactive protein in women; reduced homocysteine and marginally reduced oxidative stress in men; as well as improvements to the lipid profile in men. In healthy older people, multivitamin supplementation improved a number of blood biomarkers that are relevant to cognition, but these biomarker changes were not accompanied by improved cognitive function.

KEYWORDS:

biomarkers; cognition; multivitamins; vitamins

PMID:
25996285
PMCID:
PMC4446780
DOI:
10.3390/nu7053796
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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