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Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2015 Aug;24(8):1199-206. doi: 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-15-0187. Epub 2015 May 20.

Plasma C-reactive protein and risk of breast cancer in two prospective studies and a meta-analysis.

Author information

1
Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, School of Public Health and Health Sciences, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, Massachusetts. junw@schoolph.umass.edu.
2
Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.
3
Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts. Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.
4
Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts. Department of Ambulatory Care and Prevention, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.
5
Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. Center for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.
6
Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. Department of Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.
7
Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, School of Public Health and Health Sciences, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, Massachusetts. Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts. Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

C-reactive protein (CRP) has been evaluated as a risk factor for breast cancer in epidemiologic studies. However, results from prospective studies are inconsistent.

METHODS:

We evaluated the association using prediagnostic blood samples in a case-control study nested within the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) and the full cohort of the Women's Health Study (WHS). A total of 943 cases in the NHS and 1,919 cases in the WHS contributed to the analysis. Conditional logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards model were used in the NHS and WHS, respectively. We pooled our results with prior prospective studies using random effect meta-analysis.

RESULTS:

In the NHS, higher CRP levels were associated with a suggestively increased risk of breast cancer [quintile 5 vs. 1: relative risk (RR), 1.27; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.93-1.73; Ptrend = 0.02]; results did not vary significantly by tumor invasiveness or hormone receptor status. However, no association was observed in the WHS for overall risk (quintile 5 vs. 1: RR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.76-1.06; Ptrend = 0.38) or by tumor invasiveness or hormone receptor status. The meta-analysis (including 5,371 cases from 11 studies) showed a modestly increased risk among women in the highest versus lowest categories of CRP (RR, 1.26; 95% CI, 1.07-1.49).

CONCLUSIONS:

Existing data from prospective studies suggest that CRP, a nonspecific marker of inflammation, is modestly positively associated with breast cancer risk.

IMPACT:

Our findings provide support to the concept that inflammation can influence breast cancer development.

PMID:
25994740
PMCID:
PMC4526401
DOI:
10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-15-0187
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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