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Rheumatol Int. 2015 Oct;35(10):1631-40. doi: 10.1007/s00296-015-3292-3. Epub 2015 May 21.

Behaviour change interventions to promote physical activity in rheumatoid arthritis: a systematic review.

Author information

1
Department of Clinical Therapies, Faculty of Education and Health Sciences, University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland. Louise.Larkin@ul.ie.
2
Department of Psychology, Faculty of Education and Health Sciences, University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland.
3
Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, University of the West of England, Bristol, UK.
4
Department of Clinical Therapies, Faculty of Education and Health Sciences, University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland.
5
University of Limerick Medical School, University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland.
6
University Hospital Limerick, Limerick, Ireland.

Abstract

Research has shown that people who have rheumatoid arthritis (RA) do not usually participate in enough physical activity to obtain the benefits of optimal physical activity levels, including quality of life, aerobic fitness and disease-related characteristics. Behaviour change theory underpins the promotion of physical activity. The aim of this systematic review was to explore behaviour change interventions which targeted physical activity behaviour in people who have RA, focusing on the theory underpinning the interventions and the behaviour change techniques utilised using specific behaviour change taxonomy. An electronic database search was conducted via EBSCOhost, PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and Web of Science databases in August 2014, using Medical Subject Headings and keywords. A manual search of reference lists was also conducted. Randomised control trials which used behaviour change techniques and targeted physical activity behaviour in adults who have RA were included. Two reviewers independently screened studies for inclusion. Methodological quality was assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Five studies with 784 participants were included in the review. Methodological quality of the studies was mixed. The studies consisted of behaviour change interventions or combined practical physical activity and behaviour change interventions and utilised a large variety of behaviour change techniques. Four studies reported increased physical activity behaviour. All studies used subjective methods of assessing physical activity with only one study utilising an objective measure. There has been varied success of behaviour change interventions in promoting physical activity behaviour in people who have RA. Further studies are required to develop and implement the optimal behaviour change intervention in this population.

KEYWORDS:

Behaviour change; Physical activity; Promotion; Rheumatoid arthritis

PMID:
25994094
DOI:
10.1007/s00296-015-3292-3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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