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Nat Rev Neurosci. 2015 Jun;16(6):345-57. doi: 10.1038/nrn3961.

Compromised autophagy and neurodegenerative diseases.

Author information

1
Department of Medical Genetics, University of Cambridge, Cambridge Institute for Medical Research, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Hills Road, Cambridge CB2 0XY, UK.
2
1] Department of Medical Genetics, University of Cambridge, Cambridge Institute for Medical Research, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Hills Road, Cambridge CB2 0XY, UK. [2] Department of Physiology, Development and Neuroscience, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EG, UK.

Abstract

Most neurodegenerative diseases that afflict humans are associated with the intracytoplasmic deposition of aggregate-prone proteins in neurons and with mitochondrial dysfunction. Autophagy is a powerful process for removing such proteins and for maintaining mitochondrial homeostasis. Over recent years, evidence has accumulated to demonstrate that upregulation of autophagy may protect against neurodegeneration. However, autophagy dysfunction has also been implicated in the pathogenesis of various diseases. This Review summarizes the progress that has been made in our understanding of how perturbations in autophagy are linked with neurodegenerative diseases and the potential therapeutic strategies resulting from the modulation of this process.

PMID:
25991442
DOI:
10.1038/nrn3961
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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