Format

Send to

Choose Destination
BJOG. 2015 Jul;122(8):1062-72. doi: 10.1111/1471-0528.13435. Epub 2015 May 19.

Differential effect of intrauterine growth restriction on childhood neurodevelopment: a systematic review.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, Warneford Hospital, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
2
Nuffield Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, Oxford Maternal & Perinatal Health Institute, Green Templeton College, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Neurodevelopmental disorders are increasingly believed to originate from intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). Current reviews exploring the neurodevelopmental effects of IUGR, however, are mostly based on birthweight, an inadequate proxy.

OBJECTIVE:

We aimed to examine the association between IUGR documented in utero, and neurodevelopmental outcomes during childhood.

SEARCH STRATEGY:

Medline, CINAHL, PsycInfo and Scopus were searched for relevant studies published after 1970.

SELECTION CRITERIA:

The analysis included studies that identified IUGR in utero, with follow-up assessments between 1 month and 12 years of age.

DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS:

Data was extracted for cognitive, behavioural, language, motor, hearing, vision or sleep outcomes. Studies were summarised separately for children born at <35 and ≥35 weeks gestation.

MAIN RESULTS:

Of 28 876 titles identified, 38 were suitable for inclusion. IUGR children born ≥35 weeks gestation scored on average 0.5 SD lower than non-IUGR children across all neurodevelopmental assessments. IUGR children born <35 weeks of gestation scored approximately 0.7 SD lower than non-IUGR children across all neurodevelopmental assessments. IUGR children with evidence of fetal circulatory redistribution (preferential perfusion of the brain) had more severe neurodevelopmental impairments than those born IUGR alone.

CONCLUSIONS:

IUGR increases the risk of neurodevelopmental impairment during childhood differentially across domains. IUGR children born preterm or with evidence of fetal circulatory redistribution are more severely affected.

TWEETABLE ABSTRACT:

IUGR is associated with an overall risk for neurodevelopmental delay in a range of neurodevelopmental domains.

KEYWORDS:

Doppler velocimetry; fetal growth retardation; intrauterine growth restriction; neurodevelopment; serial ultrasound biometry; small-for-gestational-age

PMID:
25990812
DOI:
10.1111/1471-0528.13435
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley
Loading ...
Support Center