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Vet J. 2015 Jul;205(1):56-61. doi: 10.1016/j.tvjl.2015.03.025. Epub 2015 Mar 25.

Impact of three inactivated bovine viral diarrhoea virus vaccines on bulk milk p80 (NS3) ELISA test results in dairy herds.

Author information

1
Animal and Bioscience Research Department, Animal and Grassland Research and Innovation Centre, Teagasc, Moorepark, Fermoy, County Cork, Ireland. Electronic address: riona.sayers@teagasc.ie.
2
Epsilion Ltd., 'Dun Baoi', Derryquay, Tralee, County Kerry, Ireland.
3
Animal Health Ireland, Main Street, Carrick-on-Shannon, County Leitrim, Ireland.
4
Department of Life Sciences, University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland.

Abstract

Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) is endemic in many countries and vaccines are used as a component of control and eradication strategies. Surveillance programmes to detect exposure to BVDV often incorporate the use of bulk milk (BM) testing for antibodies against BVDV p80 (NS3), but vaccination can interfere with these results. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether BVDV vaccines would confound BM testing for specific antibodies in a nationally representative group of commercial dairy farms in the Republic of Ireland. A total of 256 commercial dairy herds were included in the statistical analysis. Quarterly BM or serum samples from selected weanling heifers (unvaccinated homeborn youngstock) were assessed by ELISA for antibodies against the BVDV p80 subunit and whole virus. Wilcoxon rank-sum and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses were used to examine differences among groups vaccinated with one of three commercially available inactivated BVDV vaccines. Two of the three vaccines showed evidence of interference with ELISA testing of BM samples. ROC analysis highlighted that one vaccine did not reduce the discriminatory power of the BVDV p80 ELISA for identification of herds with evidence of recent BVDV circulation, when compared with unvaccinated herds; thus, administration of this vaccine would allow uncomplicated interpretation of BM ELISA test results in vaccinated seropositive herds. Seasonal differences in BM antibody results were identified, suggesting that the latter half of lactation is the most suitable time for sampling dairy herds containing predominantly spring calving cows. The results of the present study are likely to prove useful in countries allowing vaccination during or following BVDV eradication, where BM testing is required as part of the surveillance strategy.

KEYWORDS:

Bovine viral diarrhoea virus; Bulk milk; Dairy cattle; ELISA; Vaccine

PMID:
25986132
DOI:
10.1016/j.tvjl.2015.03.025
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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