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Environ Pollut. 2015 Sep;204:256-63. doi: 10.1016/j.envpol.2015.04.024. Epub 2015 May 15.

Maternal exposure to alkali, alkali earth, transition and other metals: Concentrations and predictors of exposure.

Author information

1
Centre for Ecosystem Management, Edith Cowan University, Western Australia, Australia. Electronic address: a.hinwood@ecu.edu.au.
2
School of Population Health, University of Western Australia, Australia.
3
Centre for Ecosystem Management, Edith Cowan University, Western Australia, Australia; School of Medical Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Western Australia, Australia.
4
Centre for Ecosystem Management, Edith Cowan University, Western Australia, Australia; Department of Chemistry Malaysia, Jalan Sultan, Petaling Jaya, 46661 Selangor, Malaysia.
5
Centre for Ecosystem Management, Edith Cowan University, Western Australia, Australia.
6
ChemCentreWA, PO Box 1250, Bentley, WA 6983, Australia.
7
Department of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, N-9037 Tromsø, Norway.

Abstract

Most studies of metals exposure focus on the heavy metals. There are many other metals (the transition, alkali and alkaline earth metals in particular) in common use in electronics, defense industries, emitted via combustion and which are naturally present in the environment, that have received limited attention in terms of human exposure. We analysed samples of whole blood (172), urine (173) and drinking water (172) for antimony, beryllium, bismuth, cesium, gallium, rubidium, silver, strontium, thallium, thorium and vanadium using ICPMS. In general most metals concentrations were low and below the analytical limit of detection with some high concentrations observed. Few factors examined in regression models were shown to influence biological metals concentrations and explained little of the variation. Further study is required to establish the source of metals exposures at the high end of the ranges of concentrations measured and the potential for any adverse health impacts in children.

KEYWORDS:

Alkali earth metals; Alkali metals; Blood; Drinking water; Human exposure; Urine

PMID:
25984984
DOI:
10.1016/j.envpol.2015.04.024
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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