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Neurocase. 2016;22(1):65-75. doi: 10.1080/13554794.2015.1045523. Epub 2015 May 18.

Eye movements as probes of lexico-semantic processing in a patient with primary progressive aphasia.

Author information

1
a Cognitive Neurology and Alzheimer's Disease Center , Northwestern University , Chicago , IL , USA.
2
b Department of Preventive Medicine , Northwestern University , Chicago , IL , USA.
3
c Department of Medical Social Sciences , Northwestern University , Chicago , IL , USA.

Abstract

Eye movement trajectories during a verbally cued object search task were used as probes of lexico-semantic associations in an anomic patient with primary progressive aphasia. Visual search was normal on trials where the target object could be named but became lengthy and inefficient on trials where the object failed to be named. The abnormality was most profound if the noun denoting the object could not be recognized. Even trials where the name of the target object was recognized but not retrieved triggered abnormal eye movements, demonstrating that retrieval failures can have underlying associative components despite intact comprehension of the corresponding noun.

KEYWORDS:

anterior temporal lobe; aphasia; eye movements; object naming; single-word comprehension

PMID:
25982291
PMCID:
PMC4651860
DOI:
10.1080/13554794.2015.1045523
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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