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Reprod Biomed Online. 2015 Jul;31(1):30-8. doi: 10.1016/j.rbmo.2015.03.007. Epub 2015 Mar 27.

The impact of food intake and social habits on embryo quality and the likelihood of blastocyst formation.

Author information

1
Fertility- Centro de Fertilização Assisitda, São Paulo, São paulo, Brazil. Electronic address: dbraga@fertility.com.br.
2
Fertility- Centro de Fertilização Assisitda, São Paulo, São paulo, Brazil.
3
Instituto Sapientiae - Centro de Estudos e Pesquisa em Reprodução Humana Assistida, São Paulo, Brazil.

Abstract

The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of patients' lifestyle factors and eating habits on embryo development. A total of 2659 embryos recovered from 269 patients undergoing intracytoplasmic sperm injection cycles were included. The frequency of intake of food items and social habits were registered and its influences on embryo development evaluated. The consumption of cereals, vegetables and fruits positively influenced the embryo quality at the cleavage stage. The quality of the embryo at the cleavage stage was also negatively correlated with the consumption of alcoholic drinks and smoking habits. The consumption of fruits influenced the likelihood of blastocyst formation, which was also positively affected by the consumption of fish. Being on a weight-loss diet and consumption of red meat had a negative influence on the likelihood of blastocyst formation. The likelihood of blastocyst formation was also negatively influenced by the consumption of alcoholic drinks and by smoking habits. The consumption of red meat and body mass index had a negative effect on the implantation rate and the likelihood of pregnancy. In addition, being on a weight-loss diet had a negative influence on implantation rate. Our evidence suggests a possible relationship between environmental factors and ovary biology.

KEYWORDS:

eating habits; female infertility; food intake; intracytoplasmic sperm injection; lifestyle

PMID:
25982093
DOI:
10.1016/j.rbmo.2015.03.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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