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Cell Rep. 2015 May 26;11(8):1280-92. doi: 10.1016/j.celrep.2015.04.044. Epub 2015 May 14.

Two independent mushroom body output circuits retrieve the six discrete components of Drosophila aversive memory.

Author information

1
Genes and Dynamics of Memory Systems, Brain Plasticity Unit, CNRS, ESPCI-ParisTech, PSL Research University, 10 rue Vauquelin, 75005 Paris, France.
2
Genes and Dynamics of Memory Systems, Brain Plasticity Unit, CNRS, ESPCI-ParisTech, PSL Research University, 10 rue Vauquelin, 75005 Paris, France. Electronic address: pierre-yves.placais@espci.fr.
3
Genes and Dynamics of Memory Systems, Brain Plasticity Unit, CNRS, ESPCI-ParisTech, PSL Research University, 10 rue Vauquelin, 75005 Paris, France. Electronic address: thomas.preat@espci.fr.

Abstract

Understanding how the various memory components are encoded and how they interact to guide behavior requires knowledge of the underlying neural circuits. Currently, aversive olfactory memory in Drosophila is behaviorally subdivided into four discrete phases. Among these, short- and long-term memories rely, respectively, on the γ and α/β Kenyon cells (KCs), two distinct subsets of the ∼2,000 neurons in the mushroom body (MB). Whereas V2 efferent neurons retrieve memory from α/β KCs, the neurons that retrieve short-term memory are unknown. We identified a specific pair of MB efferent neurons, named M6, that retrieve memory from γ KCs. Moreover, our network analysis revealed that six discrete memory phases actually exist, three of which have been conflated in the past. At each time point, two distinct memory components separately recruit either V2 or M6 output pathways. Memory retrieval thus features a dramatic convergence from KCs to MB efferent neurons.

PMID:
25981036
DOI:
10.1016/j.celrep.2015.04.044
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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