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J Med Case Rep. 2015 May 15;9:113. doi: 10.1186/s13256-015-0596-6.

Sleep apnea and severe bradyarrhythmia--an alternative treatment option: a case report.

Author information

1
Section of Adult Cardiology, Cardiovascular Department, King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Center, P.O. Box 40047, Jeddah, 21499, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. amindaoulah@yahoo.com.
2
Internal Medicine Department, University of Alabama Huntsville Regional Medical Campus, Huntsville, Alabama, USA. dr.sara.ocheltree@gmail.com.
3
Section of Pulmonology, Internal Medicine Department, King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Center, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. salemalfaifi@hotmail.com.
4
Section of Infectious Disease, Internal Medicine Department, King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Center, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. waleedamasaib@hotmail.com.
5
Heart and Vascular Institute, Sheikh Khalifa Medical City, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. alsheikhali@gmail.com.
6
Department of Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA. alsheikhali@gmail.com.
7
Department of Family Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. farhan.asrar@medportal.ca.
8
Health & Counselling Centre, University of Toronto, Mississauga, Ontario, Canada. farhan.asrar@medportal.ca.
9
Baystate Medical Center, Tufts University School of Medicine, Springfield, Massachusetts, USA. amir.lotfi@tufts.edu.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Sinus arrest, atrio-ventricular block, supraventricular, and ventricular arrhythmias have been reported in patients with sleep apnea syndrome. The arrhythmias usually occur during sleep and contribute to the cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and the treatment of sleep apnea usually results in the resolution of the brady- arrhythmias. Weight loss, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), oral appliances, and upper airway surgery are the recommended treatments, however, compliance and efficacy are issues.

CASE PRESENTATION:

A 58-year-old Arab man presented with recurrent presyncope. He was subsequently diagnosed with sleep apnea associated with frequent and significant sinus pauses. He presented a treatment challenge because he refused continuous positive airway pressure and pacemaker, however, he was successfully treated with theophylline.

CONCLUSION:

Frequent and significant sinus pause associated with sleep apnea was successfully treated with theophylline in our patient when the standard treatment of care was refused.

PMID:
25975802
PMCID:
PMC4437673
DOI:
10.1186/s13256-015-0596-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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